Joe Pintauro




reviews



Raft of the Medusa: Pintauro preaches positivism but not dumb optimism, realism rather than fatalism: and he affirms and celebrates love amid the acerbic banter.  It's the detail in the performances and the witty, weepy impact of dialogue that triumphantly elevates Pintauros writing.   

NICK CURTIS,  THE EVENING STANDARD, LONDON.  Jan 19, 1995.


'The question of forgiveness is angled here even more uncomfortably than in "Angels in America,"  Donalds unforgiven ghost haunts the group session which Pintauro presents to us in all its heart-wrenching, recrimination ridden and blackly comical emotional messiness."  

PAUL TAYLOR, THE INDEPENDENT, LONDON.


The excitement of "RAFT" is that you never know where it will go next.  It achieves extraordinary highs and lows.  Following it, I both laughed and cried several times.   Several aspects resemble Tony Kushner's "Angels in America,"  which came after "Raft", but Pintauro's dramaturgy is less schematic and his writing more sensitive to human feeling in all its peaks and troughs.  The issues become unusually gripping here because Pintauro's stage world is persuasive.   It is the finest AIDS drama I have seen.     

ALISTAIR MACAULAY,  THE TIMES, LONDON.


AMERICAN DIVINE (1995-6), CHICAGO.

Nominated for six Jeffersons for 1995, it appeared in four major "Year End Best" Lists, was called "Best Play of 1995" by The Reader and The New City and has been invited to The Traverse Theatre, Edinborough Festival, August, 1996.


"The umbrella title of the three-part production of 26 short plays required a trio of directors and a cast of 21.  This impressive epic also required and found a unifying vision to encompass the saints and sinners and the dreamers and destroyers of Pintauro's sacred and profane world.  There are bursts of unforgettable poetry.  Pintauros greatest strength is his poetic impulse--a lush blend of lyricism and mean streets rage.   All of Pintauro's characters are torn between sinning and penitence."

HEDY WEISS, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES.


"Pintauro uses poetic devices to link the plays thematically and the actors are true to the work as literature as well as psychological drama.  If they had compressed the best of Pintauro's playlets into one or perhaps two programs, American Divine would be a masterpiece.  As it is, it is simply superb."

ALBERT WILLIAMS, THE CHICAGO READER (AND AMERICAN THEATRE)


"So sublime is this production, I left the theatre in an altered state.  In play after play of this beautiful, hopeful evening, we see the alienated enlightened and the estranged reunited.  As you might expect from a playwright who avoids Hallmark moments like the plague, few of these reconciliations are conventional. "

NEW CITY, CHICAGO.


BY THE SEA, BY THE SEA, BY THE BEAUTIFUL SEA.

"This was another of Manhattan Theatre Club's clever, quicksilver, wry, ironic takes--in an elegantly realist, blue and gold, but never literalist vein--on contemporary life."

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL


BY THE SEA, BY THE SEA, BY THE BEAUTIFUL SEA.

"To an irreconcilable rivalry, Mr.  Pintauro brings an uncommon gift of clarity, toughened by the reality of psychological truths and damages, tempered by an outcry from the heart.   It is so moving as to cause one to marvel at how the language of theater art can express the accumulated rage, the scarred disclosures--all that is so patly called life's baggage--with the focus and empathy that real life, blindingly defensive, does not allow.  Without resorting to fake reconciliation, Mr. Pintauro's compassionate cameo eloquently takes in a husband's devotion to his wife.  In a stunning final tableau, it becomes dramatially evident that a theatrical moment can be momentous."

NEW YORK TIMES.


"Pintauro's play, DAWN, in this trilogy with Lanford Wilson and Terrence McNally, is not only the best but also of a quite different tonality.  Here is a savage, Albee-like evisceration of a family's values, as Pintauro's verbal scalpel strips his characters to the bone in double-quick time.   This is impressive."

CLIVE BARNES,  NEW YORK POST.



FICTION:


"COLD HANDS" is a moving, splendid, hauntingly beautiful novel... A book about loving and needing.  Raises blunt questions about human feelings and dares to answer them... Dreamlike and lovely, it speaks aloud and alike to anyone."  

EVAN HUNTER, THE NEW YORK TIMES. 

(A new and noteworthy NY Times selection as well as best novels of the year selection.)


"Pintauro has captured the connection and oppostition between human love and sexuality in this theatrical, halucinatory novel."

HOWARD MOSS, THE NEW YORKER.


"...and It is the struggle of the central character to become humanly whole that is focal and handled in a Lawrencian way.”  Marvelous.  The delicate and sure clarity of Pintauro's prose is a constant pleasure.  Events unfold with simple and meticulous grace.  One comes away from the novel, remembering its wit, tenderness and dignity."

AMERICAN BOOK REVIEW


"Moving in unexpected ways... imaginative, a fervent examination of memory, its slippery role as creator of lives and relationships... Pintauro's presentation of the connections between childhood, adulthood and sexuality are as revealing as they are evocative...It's a novel many of us might wish to have read long ago."

RUSSEL BANKS.


"Engaging. A novel free of old restraints."

ALAN CHEUSE, LOS ANGELES TIMES.


"Powerfull, drenched in furtive, ferocious lust and the profound raptures that love causes.  Has the heady weight of the blood bond out of D.H. Lawrence.  Remarkable, it transcends its category of fiction, mixing the ingredients of popular drama with a poet's sensibility."  THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER.





Joe Pintauro is best known for his plays, poetry and fiction but he discovered photography when he was commissioned to photograph the shanty towns of Lima, Peru and Santiago, Chile. Pintauro has written about Chile and the murder of democratically elected President Allende in 1973 and also the concomitant death of the poet Pablo Neruda. He collaborated with artists Corita Kent and Norman La Liberte with several award winning art books of his poetry  published by Harper Collins.  His novel Cold Hands was singled out by the NY Times as one of the best novels of the year and his plays are often produced in the US and Europe.  In the past fifteen years Pintauro has returned to photography with collections called Americana,  Atlantica, and Nunc et Semper, photos of Saint Marc’s Square. Pintauro is preparing a photo essay on Naples Italy.  His photographs won honorable mention at the Guild Hall Museum in 2012, Lily Wei curator, and recently by Elizabeth Sussman, photography curator for the Whitney, NYC.